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The Hyde and Watson Foundation

Profile

Last profile update: 12/20/2016
Last grant data update: 06/18/2016

At A Glance

The Hyde and Watson Foundation

31-F Mountain Blvd.

Warren, NJ United States 07059-5617

Telephone: (908) 753-3700

URL: fdnweb.org/hydeandwatson

Type of Grantmaker

Independent foundation

EIN

222425725

BRIDGE Number

4449584612

Background

The Lillia Babbitt Hyde Foundation incorporated in 1924 in NY; The John Jay and Eliza Jane Watson Foundation incorporated in 1949; consolidation of two foundations into Hyde and Watson Foundation in 1983 - Lillia Babbitt (1856-1939) married Clarence Hyde, a New York lawyer, and was widowed at age 62, outliving her husband and only child. To augment her many charitable contributions in fields such as medical research, health care, and education, she established the Lillia Babbitt Hyde Foundation in 1924 with a donation of $64,000. She was its president until her death in 1939 and left the bulk of her estate to the foundation, raising the book value of its assets as of June 1941 to approximately $3.2 million. John Jay Watson (1874-1939) was born in Rhode Island and started his business career in the rubber tire industry with United States Rubber Company. For five years he was a member of the State Legislature, and in 1900 married Eliza Jane Ralph. The couple then moved to New York the following year. John Watson died in 1939, and his widow decided that a fitting tribute to him would be the establishment of a foundation to continue their many philanthropic works. The John Jay and Eliza Jane Watson Foundation was incorporated in 1949 with Mrs. Watson as chairman, and in 1950 recorded a net worth of $80,000 from which the first eleven grants totaling $1,300 were made in the areas of religion, education and social services. When Mrs. Watson died in 1957, she contributed $4,500,000, the bulk of her estate, to the foundation. The two foundations were consolidated in 1983 in the interest of more efficient management

Purpose and Activities

Support for capital projects such as hard costs related to construction or purchase of new facilities, building renovations and improvements, purchase of capital equipment and furnishings, one-time capital needs, support to limited medical research. Broad fields include health, education, religion, social services, arts, and humanities. .